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Poker Glossary

Refers to a hidden advantage or resource that a player keeps secret until it can be used to gain an advantage over their opponents.

Literally, the term refers to having an ace card as one of your hole cards (the cards that are dealt face down to each player) in a game like Texas Hold’em, which can be a powerful card to have in certain situations. But figuratively, the term is used to describe any hidden advantage or surprise move that a player has up their sleeve and can use to gain an edge over their opponents.

Refers to a player’s turn to make a decision during a hand. When a player is “acting,” it means that it is their turn to either check, bet, call, raise, or fold, depending on the action that has taken place before them.

The order of play is determined by the position of the players at the table. The player who is closest to the left of the dealer is the first to act in each betting round, while the player who is closest to the right of the dealer is the last to act. This order of play is important because it can impact the decisions that players make, especially if they are trying to bluff or deceive their opponents.

In general, acting out of turn is not allowed in poker, as it can give an unfair advantage to the player who does so. Players must wait for their turn to act before making any decisions, or risk penalties such as a warning or a forced sit-out of a hand.

In poker, “acting out of turn” means making a betting decision before it is your turn to act. This can include any action that is taken out of turn, such as checking, betting, calling, raising, or folding.

Acting out of turn can be a serious breach of poker etiquette, as it can give an unfair advantage to the player who acts out of turn. It can also affect the dynamics of the hand and give other players information they would not have had otherwise, potentially changing the course of the hand.

If a player acts out of turn, the dealer will generally ask them to wait until it is their turn to act and revert the action that they took out of turn. Depending on the severity of the infraction, a player who acts out of turn may receive a warning, a penalty, or be forced to sit out of the hand altogether.

“Action” refers to the amount of betting and wagering activity that is taking place during a hand. This can include any bets, raises, calls, or folds that have been made by the players.

The level of action in a hand can be an important factor in determining a player’s strategy and decision-making process. For example, if there is a lot of action in a hand, it may indicate that the other players have strong hands and are willing to put a lot of chips at risk. Conversely, if there is little action in a hand, it may indicate that the other players have weak hands or are not willing to commit a lot of chips to the pot.

In some cases, the term “action” may also refer specifically to the act of placing a bet or making a wager during a hand. For example, a player may say “I’ll take action” to indicate that they are willing to place a bet or raise.

The term “action card” generally refers to a community card that is dealt face up on the board and is likely to increase the amount of betting and wagering activity in a hand.

An action card is typically a card that completes a draw, creates a strong hand, or increases the likelihood that players will have a strong hand. For example, if a straight or flush draw is possible on the board and an action card is dealt that completes the draw, players may be more likely to bet or raise aggressively.

Action cards can also increase the number of possible hands that players can make, which can create more opportunities for betting and wagering. For example, if a low card is dealt on the board in a game like Texas Hold’em, it may create more opportunities for players to make two pairs, sets, or straights, which can lead to more action.

Overall, the term “action card” is often used to describe a card that is likely to increase the amount of betting and wagering activity in a hand, and which can potentially change the course of the hand.

In poker, the term “active players” refers to the players who are still involved in a hand and have not yet folded or been eliminated from the hand.

The number of active players in a hand can change throughout the course of the hand, as players make decisions and either fold or continue to stay in the hand. The more active players there are in a hand, the more complex the hand becomes and the more opportunities there are for betting and wagering.

In some poker games, such as tournament play, the number of active players can be an important factor in determining payouts or prize money. For example, in a tournament with a guaranteed prize pool, the prize money may be divided up based on the number of active players remaining in the tournament at a certain point, with each remaining player receiving a portion of the total prize pool.

Overall, the term “active players” is used to refer to the players who are currently involved in a hand and have not yet dropped out, and it can be an important factor in determining the dynamics and outcomes of a hand or game.

“Add-on” is an optional purchase of additional chips that a player can make during a tournament, usually at a specific point in the tournament.

The add-on period typically occurs after a certain number of levels or hands have been played, and allows players who have already exhausted their starting stack of chips to purchase additional chips and continue playing in the tournament. The add-on amount is usually a fixed amount and may be limited to a certain number of chips.

Add-ons are different from rebuys, which allow players to purchase additional chips during a designated period of time after they have lost all of their starting chips. Add-ons are typically only available at specific points in the tournament and are not available to players who have not exhausted their starting stack.

The use of add-ons can be beneficial for players who are short-stacked and looking to increase their chances of staying in the tournament. It can also increase the overall prize pool of the tournament, as the money collected from add-ons is typically added to the tournament’s prize pool.

In poker, “advertising” refers to a player’s behavior or actions at the table that reveal information about the strength or weakness of their hand to other players. Advertising can take many forms, such as the way a player looks at their cards, how they place their chips, or their demeanor during a hand.

A player who is advertising may be intentionally or unintentionally revealing information about their hand to other players, which can be used to gain an advantage in the hand. For example, a player who appears nervous or hesitant during a hand may be signaling to other players that they have a weak hand, while a player who appears confident and relaxed may be signaling that they have a strong hand.

While some forms of advertising may be deliberate, such as making an exaggerated show of strength or weakness, other forms may be unconscious or unintentional, such as giving off physical tells.

Experienced players may use information gained from advertising to make more informed decisions about their own play, such as whether to bet, raise, or fold. Conversely, players who are aware that they are advertising may try to conceal or change their behavior in order to avoid giving away information about their hand.

Overall, the term “advertising” is used to describe a player’s behavior or actions at the table that reveal information about the strength or weakness of their hand to other players, and can be an important factor in determining the outcome of a hand or game.

In poker, the term “aggressive” or “aggression” generally refers to a player’s willingness to take risks and make bets or raises in order to put pressure on their opponents and win the pot.

An aggressive player is typically one who is more willing to take the initiative in a hand and make bets and raises rather than just calling or checking. Aggressive play can be effective in a variety of situations, such as when a player has a strong hand and wants to build the pot when they want to bluff their opponents out of the hand, or when they want to apply pressure to opponents who are playing passively.

Aggression can also be expressed in other ways, such as through a player’s body language or demeanor at the table. For example, an aggressive player may appear more confident and assertive or may use verbal or nonverbal cues to intimidate their opponents.

However, it’s important to note that aggressive play can also be risky, as it can lead to larger losses if a player is not careful. Skilled players understand when to use aggression and when to play more cautiously, depending on factors such as the strength of their hand, the actions of their opponents, and the overall dynamics of the game.

Overall, the terms “aggressive” and “aggression” are used to describe a player’s willingness to take risks and make bets or raises in order to put pressure on their opponents and win the pot, and can be an important factor in determining the outcome of a hand or game.

“Aggression Factor” (AF) is a metric used to measure how aggressive a player is in a particular hand or over the course of a game. It is typically calculated as the ratio of a player’s bets and raises to their calls.

The aggression factor is used by poker players and analysts to better understand how a player is likely to play in a given situation. A higher aggression factor suggests that a player is more willing to make bets and raises rather than just calling or checking, while a lower aggression factor suggests a more passive style of play.

The aggression factor can be calculated for individual hands, as well as over the course of an entire game or session. By analyzing a player’s aggression factor, other players can gain insight into their playing style and tendencies, and adjust their own strategy accordingly.

It’s important to note that the aggression factor is just one metric used to analyze a player’s style of play, and should be considered in conjunction with other factors such as hand strength, position, and overall table dynamics.

In poker, the term “air” is used to describe a hand that has no value or potential to win the pot. This typically refers to a hand that doesn’t even have a pair, and may consist of random or unconnected cards.

When a player has “air,” it means that they have no realistic chance of winning the hand unless their opponents fold. Playing air can be risky, as it often involves bluffing or attempting to represent a stronger hand than what the player actually has.

For example, if a player has 7-2 offsuit (a weak hand) and the community cards are 9-8-4-2-K, they have “air” because they don’t even have a pair. If they decide to bet or raise, it’s likely an attempt to bluff their opponents into folding, rather than a genuine attempt to win the pot with the strength of their hand.

Overall, the term “air” is used to describe a hand with no value or potential to win the pot, and is often associated with risky bluffing strategies.

In poker, “all in” is a betting term used to describe a player who has put all of their remaining chips into the pot during a hand. This means that the player is betting all of their remaining chips on the outcome of the hand, and cannot make any further bets or raises.

When a player goes “all in,” they are essentially putting themselves at risk of losing their entire chip stack if they do not win the hand. However, if they do win, they can potentially win all of the chips in the pot, including those that were bet by other players after the all-in bet was made.

Once a player goes all in, the other players at the table have the option to call the bet, fold their hand, or make a larger bet (if they have more chips than the all-in player). If there are multiple players still in the hand, a side pot may be created to account for the additional bets made after the all-in bet.

It’s important to note that in some poker games, there may be a “cap” on the maximum amount a player can bet or raise in a given hand. In these cases, a player who goes all in may not be able to bet or raise any further, even if they have additional chips that were not included in the all-in bet.

Refers to a deceptive or manipulative play or behavior that a player may use to gain an advantage over their opponents. Angles are generally considered unethical or unsportsmanlike, and can result in penalties or social consequences for the player using them.

Examples of angles in poker might include intentionally misrepresenting the rules of the game, misstating the size of a bet or raise, or acting out of turn to gain information about other players’ hands.

While some angles may be technically legal within the rules of the game, they are generally considered to be unethical or “dirty” plays, and can damage a player’s reputation among other players and in the larger poker community.

In many cases, the use of angles is prohibited by the rules of the game or the governing body overseeing the poker tournament or casino. Players who are caught using angles may be penalized, disqualified, or even banned from future games or tournaments.

Refers to a player using deceptive or manipulative tactics to gain an unfair advantage over their opponents. Angle shooting is generally considered unethical or unsportsmanlike behavior, and can result in penalties or social consequences for the player using them.

Examples of angle shooting might include:

  • Intentionally misrepresenting the rules of the game
  • Misstating the size of a bet or raise
  • Acting out of turn to gain information about other players’ hands
  • Making ambiguous statements or gestures to deceive opponents

While some angle shooting tactics may be technically legal within the rules of the game, they are generally considered to be dirty plays and can damage a player’s reputation among other players and in the larger poker community.

In many cases, angle shooting is prohibited by the rules of the game or the governing body overseeing the poker tournament or casino. Players who are caught angle shooting may be penalized, disqualified, or even banned from future games or tournaments.

“Ante” is a forced bet that all players at the table are required to make before the start of each hand. The ante is typically a small percentage of the minimum bet, and is used to create a pot for players to compete for in each hand.

Antes are used in many different types of poker games, including both cash games and tournaments. In a tournament, the ante is typically introduced in the later stages of the game as a way to increase the amount of chips in play and encourage more aggressive play.

The size of the ante can vary depending on the game being played and the stakes involved. In some cases, the ante may be a fixed amount for all players, while in other cases it may be a percentage of the minimum bet or the size of the pot.

“Ante off” is not a commonly used poker term. It is possible that the term is a variation of the more common term “ante,” which refers to a forced bet that all players must make before the start of each hand.

It is also possible that “ante off” is a specific term used in a particular variation of poker or in a particular context. Without further information, it is difficult to provide a more specific definition of the term.

“Baby” is a slang term used to describe a low-ranking card, particularly a low-ranking pair. For example, a pair of twos might be referred to as “babies.”

The term “baby” is also sometimes used to refer to a small bet, particularly in games with high betting limits. In this context, a “baby bet” might refer to the minimum bet or a bet that is smaller than the other bets on the table.

In poker, a “backdoor” is a type of draw that requires two consecutive cards to complete. Specifically, a backdoor draw occurs when a player has only a small chance of making a hand after the flop or turn, but could potentially make a hand if the next two cards are favorable.

For example, suppose a player has a 4 and 7 of diamonds in Texas Hold’em, and the flop comes 2 of diamonds, 9 of spades, and 5 of clubs. The player does not currently have a strong hand, but if the turn and river are both diamonds, they would complete a flush, which is a strong hand. In this case, the player has a backdoor flush draw.

Backdoor draws are generally considered to be less valuable than direct draws, which only require one card to complete. However, they can still be useful in certain situations, particularly in games with multiple betting rounds or when facing opponents who are unlikely to have strong hands.

“Back into” is a term used to describe a situation where a player unexpectedly makes a strong hand after initially having a weak or marginal hand. Specifically, a player might “back into” a hand if they improve their hand on the turn or river cards, or if they make a hand that they did not intend to make.

For example, suppose a player has a 9 and 10 of hearts in Texas Hold’em, and the flop comes 2 of spades, 7 of hearts, and king of clubs. The player does not currently have a strong hand, but if the turn and river are both hearts, they would complete a flush, which is a strong hand. If the player manages to make a flush on the turn or river, they would be said to have “backed into” the hand.

Similarly, a player might “back into” a hand if they were originally drawing to a straight or flush, but instead make a full house or other strong hand.

In poker, a “backraise” is a type of play where a player raises after initially calling a bet on the same betting round. Specifically, a backraise occurs when a player calls an opponent’s bet, and then raises when it is their turn to act again.

Backraises are often used as a way to increase the pot size and put pressure on opponents. They can also be used as a bluffing strategy to make it appear as though a player has a stronger hand than they actually do.

For example, suppose a player has a pair of queens in Texas Hold’em, and their opponent bets $10. The player might decide to call the $10 bet, and then backraise by raising to $30 when it is their turn to act. This would put pressure on the opponent and make it more difficult for them to continue in the hand, particularly if they have a weaker hand.

“Bad Beat” is a term used to describe a situation where a player loses a hand that they were favored to win, usually because of an unlikely turn of events. Specifically, a bad beat occurs when a player with a strong hand loses to an opponent who made a weaker hand by catching one or more lucky cards.

For example, suppose a player has a pair of aces in Texas Hold’em, and their opponent has a pair of 2s. The flop comes 2 of hearts, 5 of spades, and ace of diamonds, giving the player with aces a set (three of a kind). The turn is a 7 of clubs, which does not change the situation. However, the river card is a 2 of diamonds, giving the opponent a full house (three of a kind, twos, and a pair of fives), and beating the player with aces. This would be considered a bad beat for the player with aces.

In poker, “balance” refers to a strategy of playing a range of hands in a way that is difficult for opponents to predict. Specifically, a balanced strategy involves mixing up the types of hands that a player plays and the way in which they play them, in order to make it more difficult for opponents to read their playing style and gain an advantage.

For example, suppose a player is playing Texas Hold’em and is dealt two cards: 10 of diamonds and 9 of clubs. The player could decide to fold, call the initial bet, or raise the bet, depending on various factors such as their position at the table, the playing styles of their opponents, and the strength of their hand. A balanced strategy would involve mixing up these decisions so that opponents are unable to predict what the player will do based on their previous actions.

Balancing can also refer to the way in which a player sizes their bets and raises. A balanced betting strategy involves varying the size of bets and raises in a way that is not predictable, in order to make it more difficult for opponents to read the strength of a player’s hand based on their betting patterns.

In poker, “bankroll” refers to the amount of money a player sets aside specifically for playing poker. The bankroll is the total amount of money that a player has available to play with, and it is typically considered separately from the player’s other finances.

Having a sufficient bankroll is important for poker players, as it allows them to manage the ups and downs of the game and avoid going broke. A bankroll that is too small can lead to players being forced to play at lower stakes than they are capable of, while a bankroll that is too large can lead to complacency and poor decision-making.

The size of a player’s bankroll will depend on a variety of factors, including their skill level, the stakes they typically play at, and the amount of risk they are comfortable with. In general, it is recommended that players have a bankroll that is at least 20 times the maximum buy-in for the games they play, although this can vary depending on individual circumstances.

“Bankroll management” refers to the practice of managing one’s poker bankroll in a way that maximizes the chances of long-term success. This involves setting aside a specific amount of money for playing poker and then using that money in a strategic and disciplined way.

Good bankroll management involves several key principles. First, players should set aside an amount of money specifically for playing poker and not use it for other expenses. Second, players should only play at stakes that are appropriate for their bankroll, which helps to minimize the risk of going broke. For example, a player with a $1000 bankroll might only play at tables where the maximum buy-in is $50, which is 20 times their buy-in.

Third, players should also adjust the size of their bets and the number of tables they play based on their bankroll. If a player is on a downswing and their bankroll is shrinking, they may choose to play at fewer tables or make smaller bets until they are back on track.

Finally, good bankroll management involves maintaining a disciplined approach to playing poker. This means not playing above one’s skill level, avoiding tilt (emotional or irrational play), and not making impulsive decisions based on short-term results.

In poker, “behind” refers to a player’s position relative to the other players in a hand. Specifically, it refers to a player who is currently losing in the hand and needs to improve in order to win.

For example, if a player has a pair of jacks and another player has a pair of queens, the player with jacks is currently behind, since they have a weaker hand. However, if a jack comes on the turn or river, the player with jacks will have improved their hand and moved ahead of their opponent.

The term “behind” can also be used to describe a player’s position in a hand relative to the betting action. For example, if a player has not yet acted in a betting round and there are already bets and raises in front of them, they are said to be “behind” in the betting. In this case, they may choose to fold, call, or raise in order to catch up and get back in the action.

In poker, a “bet” refers to an action in which a player puts chips or money into the pot in order to make a wager on the outcome of the hand. Betting is one of the primary actions in poker and is a crucial part of the game.

There are several types of bets in poker, including:

  1. Ante – A small mandatory bet that all players at the table must make before the start of a hand.
  2. Blind – A mandatory bet that is made by the two players to the left of the dealer button before any cards are dealt. The player to the immediate left of the dealer button posts the small blind, while the player to their left posts the big blind.
  3. Opening bet – The first bet made in a betting round. The player who makes the opening bet is said to have “opened” the betting.
  4. Call – Matching the previous bet made by another player in the same round.
  5. Raise – Increasing the previous bet made by another player in the same round.
  6. Check – Declining to bet when no previous bets have been made in the same round.

Betting is a key strategy in poker, as players use their bets to try and gain information about their opponents’ hands, manipulate the pot odds, and ultimately win the hand. Understanding the different types of bets and how to use them effectively is essential for success in poker.

In poker, the term “air” is used to describe a hand that has no value or potential to win the pot. This typically refers to a hand that doesn’t even have a pair, and may consist of random or unconnected cards.

When a player has “air,” it means that they have no realistic chance of winning the hand unless their opponents fold. Playing air can be risky, as it often involves bluffing or attempting to represent a stronger hand than what the player actually has.

For example, if a player has 7-2 offsuit (a weak hand) and the community cards are 9-8-4-2-K, they have “air” because they don’t even have a pair. If they decide to bet or raise, it’s likely an attempt to bluff their opponents into folding, rather than a genuine attempt to win the pot with the strength of their hand.

Overall, the term “air” is used to describe a hand with no value or potential to win the pot, and is often associated with risky bluffing strategies.

“Big Blind Special” refers to a situation where the player who is in the big blind position wins the pot after flopping a strong hand. This term is often used to describe a situation where the player in the big blind is dealt a good starting hand, such as pocket aces or kings, and then proceeds to win the pot after the flop is dealt.

The reason why this situation is called a “big blind special” is because the big blind is a forced bet that players are required to make at the start of a hand. Since the big blind is already in the pot, they have the option to check or raise if no one has opened the pot. This can be advantageous if the big blind is dealt a strong hand and is able to make a big score.

While a big blind special can be a profitable situation for the player in that position, it is important to remember that it is still a rare occurrence and should not be relied on as a consistent strategy. Good players are able to win pots from any position at the table and do not rely solely on being dealt a strong hand while in the big blind.

“Big Blind” is a mandatory bet that is made by the player who is two seats to the left of the dealer button. The big blind is typically twice the size of the small blind, which is made by the player to the immediate left of the dealer button.

The purpose of the big blind is to create a pot for players to compete for right from the start of the hand. The player in the big blind position is required to put in this bet before the hand begins, even if they have not been dealt any cards yet.

After the big blind is posted, the other players at the table have the option to call the big blind, raise it, or fold their hand. The player in the big blind, like all other players, has the option to check or raise if no one else has raised before the action gets back to them.

The big blind position rotates around the table after each hand, so each player takes turns being in this position. Understanding how to play from the big blind position is an important part of any player’s strategy, as it requires different tactics than playing from other positions at the table.

In poker, the term “big stack” refers to a player who has a relatively large amount of chips in front of them compared to the rest of the players at the table. This can give the big stack player an advantage in that they can use their larger stack to pressure their opponents and potentially win more pots.

Having a big stack is especially important in tournaments, where the blinds and antes increase over time and players need to accumulate chips in order to survive. A big stack can provide a player with more opportunities to play aggressively and potentially win big pots.

However, being the big stack also comes with added pressure and responsibility. Other players may target the big stack player and try to take chips away from them, so the big stack player must be able to make good decisions and avoid unnecessary risks.

Ultimately, the size of a player’s stack is constantly changing in poker, and a big stack is only as valuable as the skill and strategy that the player is able to employ with it.

In poker, the term “blank” refers to a card that does not significantly affect the strength of a player’s hand or the potential strength of their opponent’s hand. A blank is a card that is not connected to the other cards on the board, and does not complete any potential draws or make any obvious strong hands.

For example, if the flop comes with three cards that are all below a player’s pocket pair, and the turn card is a blank, that card is not likely to have changed the strength of the player’s hand or provided any significant information about their opponent’s hand.

Similarly, a blank can refer to a card that does not complete any potential draws, such as a turn card that brings a third card of a suit to the board, but does not complete a flush draw.

In some situations, a player may choose to bluff on a blank card, as it is less likely to have helped their opponent’s hand. However, players must also be careful not to overvalue a blank card and make risky or unnecessary bets based on its lack of significance.

In poker, the term “bleed” generally refers to losing chips or money at a steady rate over time. It can also refer to making small, steady bets that slowly but consistently drain an opponent’s stack.

For example, a player might be said to be “bleeding chips” if they are consistently losing small amounts of chips on multiple hands, even if they are not necessarily losing big pots. Similarly, a player who is “bleeding out” may be losing chips at such a rate that they will soon be eliminated from the game.

Bleeding can also refer to a player who is making small bets or raises in order to slowly chip away at an opponent’s stack, rather than trying to win a large pot all at once. This can be an effective strategy if used correctly, as it can force opponents to make tough decisions and can build a player’s stack over time.

However, players must also be careful not to bleed too much or too quickly, as this can leave them vulnerable to larger bets or bluffs from opponents. Good bankroll management and an awareness of the overall game situation are important for avoiding excessive bleeding and maintaining a strong position at the table.

In poker, a blind is a forced bet that is placed before any cards are dealt. The two players to the left of the dealer button are usually required to post blinds, which creates a pot for players to compete for.

There are typically two types of blinds in poker: the small blind and the big blind. The small blind is usually half the size of the big blind, and both are determined by the stakes of the game. For example, in a $1/$2 game, the small blind might be $1 and the big blind might be $2.

The player to the left of the dealer button posts the small blind, and the player to their left posts the big blind. This creates an initial pot for the players to compete for, and ensures that there is always some money at stake in each hand.

Players are required to post blinds in order to keep the game moving and to prevent players from sitting out and waiting for good hands. Blinds also add an element of strategy to the game, as players must decide whether to play aggressively or conservatively based on their position and the size of the blinds.

In poker, blind defense refers to a strategy used by players who are in the small blind or big blind position and are facing a raise from a player in a later position. The goal of blind defense is to prevent the opponent from stealing the blinds by calling or re-raising their raise.

Blind defense can be a challenging strategy, as players in the blinds are typically out of position and have weaker hands than the player raising. However, it is important for players in the blinds to defend their blinds to avoid losing chips over time.

Blind defense can take many forms, such as calling with a wider range of hands to see a flop, or re-raising with strong hands to put pressure on the raiser. The specific strategy used will depend on the situation, such as the strength of the player’s hand, the size of the raise, and the position of the players involved.

In poker, a blind steal refers to a strategy where a player attempts to win the blinds (the forced bets in the form of the small blind and big blind) by raising pre-flop when they are in late position and the players in the small blind and big blind positions have weak hands or are likely to fold.

A blind steal can be an effective strategy to accumulate chips without having to see a flop, particularly in tournament play where the blinds increase over time and can become a significant portion of a player’s stack. It is also a way to take advantage of tight or passive players who are reluctant to defend their blinds with marginal hands.

The success of a blind steal will depend on a variety of factors, including the strength of the player’s hand, the position of the players at the table, and the tendencies of the opponents. If the players in the blinds suspect a blind steal, they may choose to defend their blinds by calling or re-raising, which can create a more complex situation for the player attempting the steal.

Overall, a blind steal is a valuable tool for any poker player’s arsenal, but it should be used with caution and adapted to the specific dynamics of the table.

In poker, a blocker refers to a card that a player holds that reduces the likelihood of their opponents having certain strong hands. For example, if a player holds the ace of spades in their hand, it reduces the likelihood of their opponents having a flush draw that includes the ace of spades. Blockers can be particularly valuable in games like Texas Hold’em and Omaha where players share community cards, as they can be used to narrow down the range of hands that opponents may be holding. By holding a blocker to a strong hand, a player can make it less likely that their opponent has that hand and can make more informed decisions based on their opponent’s possible ranges. In addition to reducing the likelihood of strong hands, blockers can also be used to bluff or represent certain hands. For example, if a player holds the king of hearts and the board shows two hearts, they may bluff by representing that they have a flush draw, even if they do not actually have one.

In poker, “blind off” or “blinded” refers to the process of a player losing their blinds due to sitting out or not having enough chips to cover the blind amount.

In games with blinds, such as Texas Hold’em and Omaha, each player is required to post a small blind and a big blind before the hand is dealt. These forced bets ensure there is always money in the pot and encourage action. If a player is unable to post their blind due to not having enough chips or not being present at the table, they will eventually “blind off” and lose their chips to the blinds. This process continues until the player returns or runs out of chips completely and is eliminated from the game.

The blind off process is important to keep the game moving and prevent players from stalling. It also adds an element of pressure to players with smaller stacks who must play more aggressively to avoid blinding off. It is therefore important for players to manage their chips effectively and avoid blinding off too quickly.

Is a small bet made on the river, usually by the player out of position, with the intention of preventing the opponent from making a larger bet or bluff.

The blocking bet is typically made when the player believes they have a weak hand, but still want to see a showdown. By making a small bet, the player hopes to convince their opponent to make a similar small bet or call, rather than a larger bet or raise. This can help the player save money by avoiding a larger bet, or win the pot by inducing their opponent to fold a better hand.

For example, suppose a player has a weak pair on the river and faces a large bet from their opponent. Instead of calling the bet or folding, the player may decide to make a blocking bet of a small amount to prevent their opponent from making a larger bet or bluff. If the opponent does not have a strong hand, they may decide to call the blocking bet rather than making a larger bet or raise, allowing the player to win the pot.

In poker, a “bluff” is a bet or raise made with a weak hand or with no hand at all, with the intention of convincing opponents that you have a stronger hand than you actually do. The goal of a bluff is to get your opponents to fold their better hands, allowing you to win the pot without having to show your cards.

Bluffing is an important part of poker strategy and can be used in a variety of situations. For example, a player may bluff if they have missed a draw but believe that their opponent has also missed and can be convinced to fold. Or, a player may bluff if they have a weak hand but are in a good position to represent a strong hand based on the community cards that have been dealt.

Bluffing is a risky move, as it can result in the player losing additional chips if their bluff is called. However, a successful bluff can also earn a player a significant amount of chips and can be an effective tool for keeping opponents off balance and uncertain about the strength of your hand.

Bluff catching is a poker strategy where a player with a marginal hand tries to catch an opponent who is bluffing. This involves calling a bet on the river with a hand that is not particularly strong but has some potential to win the pot. The goal is to catch an opponent who is trying to steal the pot by making a bet with a weaker hand, or to induce them to bluff again in a later hand. Bluff catching requires a good read on the opponent’s betting patterns and the ability to make a well-timed call. It is a high-risk, high-reward strategy that can result in a big win or a big loss depending on the outcome of the hand.
Bluff induce, also known as inducing a bluff, is a poker strategy where a player intentionally plays their hand in a way that encourages their opponent to make a bluff. The goal is to manipulate the opponent’s actions in order to win a larger pot than they would have won otherwise. This involves making smaller bets or checks with a strong hand in order to give the impression that the player has a weaker hand, and hoping that the opponent will take the bait and make a larger bet or raise with a weaker hand. Bluff inducing requires a good read on the opponent’s tendencies and the ability to make a convincing act. It is a risky strategy that can pay off with a big win or result in a big loss if the opponent does not take the bait.
In poker, the term “board” refers to the community cards that are dealt face-up in the center of the table and shared by all players. The board is used by players to make their best possible hand, and it can consist of anywhere from three to five cards depending on the variant of poker being played. The board is an essential part of the game as it determines the strength of each player’s hand and how they can use it to make the best possible combination with their hole cards.
In poker, a “boat” refers to a full house. A full house is a hand that consists of three cards of one rank and two cards of another rank. For example, a player holding three kings and two queens would have a “full house” or “boat” of kings over queens. The term “boat” comes from the fact that a full house can resemble a boat with a pair of cards forming the “bottom” and three of a kind forming the “top.” A full house is a strong hand in poker and usually, but not always, beats other hands such as flushes, straights, and two pairs.
In poker, a “bomb pot” is a type of cash game where all players put in a predetermined amount of money before the flop, and the action proceeds normally from there. Essentially, it’s a pot where everyone puts in a larger-than-normal amount of money pre-flop, and then the hand plays out like normal. Bomb pots can be used as a way to add excitement and unpredictability to a cash game, as players may be more willing to take risks when there is a large pot up for grabs. They are also sometimes used as a way to break up a monotonous cash game or inject some action into a slow night of play.
Bottom dealing is a cheating technique in which the dealer deals cards from the bottom of the deck instead of the top. This allows the dealer or a player working in collusion with the dealer to know what card is coming next and can give them an unfair advantage in the game. Bottom dealing is considered to be one of the most serious forms of cheating in poker and is illegal in all forms of the game. Casinos and poker rooms take strong measures to prevent cheating and catch any players who attempt to use such tactics.
In poker, “bottom end” refers to the lowest possible made hand in a particular category. For example, in a high-only game like Texas Hold’em, the bottom end of a made straight would be the lowest possible straight. Similarly, in a low-only game like Omaha Hi-Lo, the bottom end of a low hand would be the hand with the lowest five cards that all have ranks of eight or lower. “Bottom end” is usually used in the context of discussing the strength of a particular hand, with “top end” referring to the highest possible hand in a given category.

In poker, “bottom pair” or “bottom set” refers to having the lowest possible pair or set among the community cards on the board.

For example, if the board is K♣️-7♠️-4♥️-3♦️-2♣️ and a player holds K♦️7♣️, they have “bottom pair” with a pair of sevens. Similarly, if a player holds 4♠️4♣️ and the board is K♥️9♣️4♥️3♦️J♠️, they have “bottom set” with a set of fours.

Bottom pair and bottom set can be vulnerable to higher pairs and sets, so players must use caution when playing them.

In poker, a bounty is a cash prize that is awarded to a player for eliminating another player from the game. Bounties are most commonly found in tournament play, where a portion of the buy-in goes towards the prize pool and a portion goes towards bounties. When a player eliminates another player, they receive the bounty that was placed on the eliminated player. Bounties can add an extra layer of excitement to tournament play, as players have the opportunity to win additional cash prizes beyond the regular tournament payouts.
In poker, “brick” typically refers to a community card (usually the turn or river) that doesn’t improve any player’s hand. In other words, the card is considered useless or unimportant. The term “brick” is often used in the context of a player missing a draw and receiving a brick on the turn or river, meaning they were not able to improve their hand and are unlikely to win the pot. Additionally, a player who is said to have “bricked” a hand means they failed to make any hand of value on the board.
In the context of poker, “brick and mortar” refers to a physical casino or poker room, as opposed to an online poker room. It comes from the fact that physical casinos are typically made of brick and mortar, which distinguishes them from virtual, online casinos. Players who prefer the experience of playing in a physical casino may use the term “brick and mortar” to differentiate from online play.
In some forms of poker, such as Seven Card Stud, Bring In is the required minimum bet made by the player with the lowest-ranking upcard in the first round of betting. It is usually half the size of the lower betting limit for that game. The Bring In is considered an “open” and is counted towards the first round of betting. After the initial betting round, the player with the highest-ranking hand showing begins the action.
In poker, “Broadway” is a slang term used to refer to the highest straight possible on the board. It is also known as a “royal straight” or “ace-high straight,” and consists of the cards A-K-Q-J-10, all of the same suit. For example, if the board shows A-K-Q-J-9, any player holding a 10 in their hand would have a Broadway straight. The term “Broadway” comes from the famous street in New York City, which is often associated with glitz and glamour.

In a poker tournament, the bubble refers to the point in the tournament where only one more player needs to be eliminated before the remaining players will make it into the money.

For example, in a tournament that pays the top 10 players, the bubble is reached when only 11 players remain. At this point, the 11th-place finisher is said to have “bubbled” the tournament and will not receive any payout, while the other remaining players are guaranteed to win at least a minimum payout. The bubble is often considered a crucial and tense moment in a tournament as players will be trying to avoid being eliminated, while others may take advantage of the situation and try to accumulate more chips.

In poker, a bully is a player who uses their large stack size or aggressive play style to intimidate their opponents and force them to make decisions that they would not otherwise make.

The bully may also try to steal pots with bets or raises, knowing that their opponents are reluctant to risk their chips against such a formidable opponent. Bullying can be an effective strategy in certain situations, but it can also backfire if other players are able to read the bully’s tendencies and adjust their play accordingly.

In poker, a burn card, or simply a “burn,” is a card that is removed from play and placed in the discard pile face down before dealing the flop, turn, and river cards. The primary purpose of the burn card is to prevent cheating by ensuring that the top card of the deck is not accidentally exposed during the deal.

Additionally, it can prevent players from gaining information about the next card to be dealt by tracking the sequence of cards during the deal. The burn card is typically not shown to the players and has no bearing on the outcome of the hand.

In poker, the term “busted” is often used to describe a player who has lost all of their chips or has been eliminated from a tournament. When a player is “busted,” they are no longer able to participate in the game or tournament. The term can also refer to a hand that did not improve and ended up losing the pot, or a player who attempted to bluff but was called and lost the hand.
In poker, the button is a marker or a small disc that moves clockwise around the table after each hand, indicating the position of the dealer for the current hand. The player who has the button is said to be “on the button” and typically has the advantage of acting last in each round of betting. The button position is significant in games like Texas Hold’em and Omaha, where the blinds and the betting order change depending on the position of the button.
In poker, buy-in refers to the amount of money required to join a game or tournament. It is the initial amount of money a player must put on the table before they can play. The buy-in can vary depending on the specific game or tournament and can range from a few dollars to thousands of dollars in high-stakes games.
In poker, the term “buy short” refers to the practice of buying in for less than the maximum amount allowed at a particular table. For example, if the maximum buy-in at a table is $200, buying short might mean buying in for only $100 or $150. This strategy is often used by players who want to conserve their bankroll or who prefer to play a more conservative style of poker. However, it can also limit a player’s ability to win big pots, as they may not have enough chips to capitalize on favorable situations.
“Buy the button” is a term in poker that refers to a situation where a player pays an amount of money to sit in the position of the dealer, also known as the “button.” This is usually done in cash games and allows the player to act last on every betting round, giving them a positional advantage. The amount to “buy the button” is typically equal to the amount of the big blind or a multiple of it.
“Buying the pot” in poker means making a bet that is large enough to force all of the other players to fold, thus winning the pot without having to show your hand. This can be a useful strategy when a player has a weak hand but believes that their opponents’ hands are even weaker, or when they want to bluff their way to a win. “Buying the pot” is also sometimes used as a general term for aggressive play, in which a player makes large bets and raises frequently to try to intimidate their opponents and win pots without necessarily having the best hand.
In poker, to “call” means to match the amount of the previous bet or raise made by an opponent in order to stay in the game. For example, if a player bets $10, the next player can “call” by also betting $10 to stay in the hand.

“Call the clock” is a term used in poker to request that a tournament director or floor person place a clock on a player who is taking too much time to make a decision.

The clock typically gives the player 30-60 seconds to act, after which their hand is declared dead if they have not made a decision. The purpose of calling the clock is to prevent excessive stalling and keep the game moving at a reasonable pace.

In poker, a calling station is a player who calls bets frequently and doesn’t fold often, regardless of the strength of their hand. Calling stations are often seen as weak players who are easy to bluff and who allow other players to extract maximum value from their strong hands. However, calling stations can also be difficult to play against, as their unpredictability can make it harder for opponents to put them on a hand and make accurate reads.

In a poker game, a “cap game” is one in which there is a limit on the number of bets or raises that a player can make in a single betting round.

The cap is usually set at a relatively low number, such as three or four, to prevent the pot from growing too large and to encourage more action and betting. Once the cap is reached, no more bets or raises can be made for that round, and the remaining players go to a showdown to determine the winner of the pot. Cap games are most commonly found in limit poker, but they can also be used in other variations of the game.

In poker, a card protector is a small object, typically a coin or a chip, that a player places on top of their cards to prevent them from being accidentally mucked (thrown away) by the dealer or other players.

The card protector signifies that the player is still in the hand and has cards that are live. If a player’s unprotected cards are accidentally mucked by the dealer, they are considered dead and cannot be played. The use of a card protector is not required in poker, but it is a common practice among players.

In the context of poker, “cards” generally refers to the individual playing cards that are used in the game, such as the 52-card deck typically used in Texas Hold’em. The cards are typically made up of four suits (hearts, diamonds, clubs, and spades) with each suit containing thirteen cards, from Ace to King.

In poker, the players are dealt a certain number of cards, depending on the variant being played, and must use them to create the best possible hand. The specific cards in a player’s hand, along with those dealt face-up on the table, determine the strength of their hand and the decisions they make during the game.

In poker, the term “case card” refers to the last remaining card of a particular rank in the deck. For example, if four cards of the same rank are on the board, the fifth card of that rank would be referred to as the “case card.” This term is commonly used in games like Texas Hold’em or Omaha, where players can use up to five community cards to make their best hand.

A cash game is a type of poker game where players buy in with real money chips and can leave the game and cash out their chips at any time. The chips in a cash game represent real money, and the minimum and maximum buy-ins are typically set by the casino or cardroom hosting the game.

Unlike in a tournament, there is no fixed end time for a cash game, and the blinds and antes usually remain constant throughout the game. In a cash game, players can win or lose money on every hand, rather than just competing for a prize pool at the end of the tournament.

In poker, “cashing” usually refers to the process of exchanging chips for cash after winning them in a poker game or tournament. For example, a player who wins a tournament may be said to have “cashed out” by collecting their winnings from the tournament organizers. In a cash game, a player who decides to leave the game and exchange their chips for cash is also said to be “cashing out”.
In poker, “cashing out” refers to the process of exchanging chips or cashing in your chips for actual money after finishing your play at a table. This term can also be used more broadly to refer to the act of leaving a casino or cardroom and cashing in any remaining chips you may have.

In poker, “catch up” is a term used to describe the situation where a player who is behind in a hand has a chance to improve their hand and potentially win the pot.

For example, if a player is behind with a drawing hand that needs to hit a certain card, they may “catch up” if that card is dealt on a later street. The term can also be used more broadly to describe a player who has fallen behind in a tournament or session, but then starts to win hands and recover their losses.

In poker, “catch perfect” typically refers to hitting the exact card needed to complete a hand. For example, if a player has four cards to a flush and the final card they need is dealt, they have “caught perfect.” It is also used more broadly to refer to a player getting the exact card or cards they need to improve their hand.

In poker, to “chase” means to continue playing a hand in the hopes of improving it, despite having a weak hand currently. A player might “chase” if they are trying to make a particular hand, such as a flush or a straight, and need one or more specific cards to improve their hand.

The term can also be used to describe a player who is behind in chips and is making aggressive bets to try to catch up to the other players. Chasing can be a risky strategy, as it can result in a player losing more chips if they don’t improve their hand.

In poker, a check means to pass the action to the next player without making a bet. Essentially, a player checks when they do not want to bet but also do not want to fold.

A check can only occur if there has not been a bet made in the current betting round, and if all previous players have also checked. If a player bets after a check, the action continues and subsequent players must either call, raise, or fold. If all players check, the next card is dealt or the hand ends.

In poker, a check-raise is a play where a player checks when it is their turn to act, intending to induce a bet from another player, and then raises that bet once it is made.

The check-raise is a powerful move because it can create a larger pot and also give the impression that the check-raiser has a very strong hand, potentially causing opponents to fold. However, it is important to use the check-raise strategically and not overuse it, as opponents can catch on and adjust their play accordingly.

In poker, a chip refers to a round, flat piece of plastic, clay, or other material used as currency to bet and call in a poker game. Players buy in with a certain amount of chips, and the chips represent real money in the game. Different colors and denominations of chips are used to represent different amounts of money. The use of chips makes it easier to keep track of bets and pot sizes during the game.
Chip dumping is a form of collusion in which one or more players intentionally lose chips to another player at the table. It is typically done to help a particular player build up a large chip stack, and is considered cheating. Chip dumping is prohibited in all forms of poker and can result in severe penalties, including being banned from the game.
In a poker tournament, the player who has the most chips at any given time is known as the “chip leader.” This player has an advantage over the other players because they have more chips with which to bet and can put pressure on their opponents by making larger bets or raising more often. Being the chip leader does not guarantee victory, as the other players may still have strong hands or catch a lucky break, but it does give the player a better chance of winning the tournament.

In a poker tournament, a chip race is the process of exchanging lower-denomination chips for higher-denomination ones. This is done to reduce the number of smaller chips in play and to make it easier to manage the chips.

During a chip race, each player with chips of the smaller denomination receives one chip of the higher denomination for each chip they possess that is of the smaller denomination. The player with the highest remaining amount of chips of the smaller denomination receives a chip of the higher denomination if there is an odd number of chips that cannot be exchanged evenly. The smaller chips are then removed from play.

In poker, the term “chip up” refers to the process of exchanging smaller denomination chips for larger ones, typically when the value of the chips on the table increases.

This is done to make it easier to handle larger amounts of chips and to reduce the clutter on the table. For example, if a player has several $5 chips and the blinds increase to $10/$20, they might exchange their $5 chips for $25 or $100 chips to simplify the chip stack. Chip up can also refer to the process of increasing one’s chip stack during a tournament or cash game.

In poker, a “chop” occurs when two or more players decide to split the pot among themselves instead of competing for it. This can happen in a variety of ways, but it usually occurs when the remaining players in a hand have equivalent hands or when they decide to agree to split the pot before the hand is completed.

The term “chop” comes from the idea of dividing the pot into equal pieces, like chopping a piece of wood into sections. In some cases, casinos or poker rooms may also offer “chop” deals to players when a tournament is nearing its conclusion, allowing the remaining players to split the remaining prize money rather than playing for it all.

“Chopping the blinds” is a term used in poker to describe an agreement made between the players in the small and big blind positions to take back their bets and end the hand without any further action.

This usually happens when all other players have folded and the only remaining players are the small and big blinds. Rather than playing out the hand, the two players agree to take back their bets and start a new hand. Chopping the blinds is a way for the small and big blinds to save money, as they would be forced to pay these bets again in the next hand anyway.

“Click raise” is a term used in online poker to describe a player’s action of using the “raise” button rather than manually entering the amount of their raise.

It is called a “click raise” because the player simply clicks the “raise” button instead of typing in the amount of their raise. The term is not commonly used in live poker games since players typically verbally announce their raises or push out chips to signify their action.

In poker, a “coin flip” refers to a situation where two players are all-in preflop with roughly equal chances of winning the pot. It is called a “coin flip” because it is like flipping a coin to determine the winner, as both players have around a 50% chance of winning the hand. This term is often used in tournament poker, especially in situations where a player’s tournament life is on the line.

In poker, a cold call refers to the act of calling a raise without having already put in a bet or a raise in the current betting round. For example, if a player bets, and another player then raises, a third player who calls that raise without having previously bet or raised in that betting round is making a cold call.

It is called a “cold” call because the player is entering the pot “cold,” without any prior investment. Cold calling is generally considered to be a risky play, as the player is playing a larger pot with a weaker hand than if they had bet or raised themselves.

In poker, collusion refers to a situation where two or more players secretly work together to cheat other players at the table.

Collusion can take many forms, such as signaling to each other about the strength of their hands, sharing information about their hole cards, or even sharing chips. Collusion is considered a serious violation of poker rules and ethics and can result in penalties ranging from disqualification to lifetime bans from casinos and online poker sites.

“Color change” or “Color up” refers to exchanging a large number of smaller denomination chips for fewer chips of higher denominations.

For example, if a player has accumulated many $1 chips and wants to exchange them for larger denominations, they can request a “color change” and receive higher denomination chips in exchange for their smaller chips.

This helps to reduce the amount of chips in play and makes it easier to manage large stacks. The excess chips are usually removed from play and taken out of circulation.

A community card, also known as a board card, is a card in certain variations of poker that is dealt face-up in the center of the table and can be used by all players to make their best hand.

In Texas Hold’em and Omaha, for example, there are five community cards dealt in the middle of the table and each player uses those cards in combination with their own hole cards to make their best possible five-card hand. Community cards allow for more complex and strategic gameplay, as players have more information to work with in determining the strength of their own hands and the likelihood of their opponents having strong hands as well.

In poker, “complete” typically refers to a specific action in a stud game. When a player has already placed the bring-in bet and another player wants to call that bet, they have the option to “complete” the bet by betting the lower limit of the game. This is also known as completing the bet to the full bet amount.

For example, in a $10/$20 seven-card stud game, the player with the lowest door card is required to post a bring-in bet of $5. If another player wants to call that bet and “complete” it, they would bet an additional $10 to reach the full bet amount of $10 for the remaining rounds of betting.

In poker, connectors refer to two consecutive cards in the same suit. For example, 7 and 8 of hearts are connectors. These cards are considered valuable in Texas Hold’em and other poker games as they can form a straight if the right cards come on the flop, turn, and river.

Players with connectors in their starting hand are more likely to play their hand than those without them, as they offer more opportunities to make a strong hand.

A continuation bet, commonly referred to as a “c-bet,” is a bet made by the pre-flop raiser on the flop, regardless of whether they improved their hand.

The term “continuation” comes from the idea that the player is continuing their aggression from the pre-flop betting round. The purpose of a continuation bet is to take down the pot immediately or to give the appearance of a strong hand to intimidate opponents.

A continuation bet is a standard play in no-limit hold’em, but its effectiveness depends on a number of factors, such as the texture of the flop, the number of opponents, and the players’ tendencies.

In poker, a “cooler” refers to a situation where a player has a strong hand, but it loses to an even stronger hand. It usually happens when two players have hands that are very strong but one is just slightly stronger than the other.

For example, if one player has a set of kings, and the other player has a set of aces, the player with kings is said to have been “cooled.” The term “cooler” is often used to describe a situation that is outside of a player’s control, as opposed to a bad beat, which refers to a situation where a player loses despite having the best hand.

Is a situation where a community card that is dealt later in a hand makes a player’s hand less valuable, even though the player had a strong hand before that card was dealt.

For example, if a player has a pair of Jacks in their hand and the board is dealt with two more Jacks and a 10, the player’s hand has been “counterfeited” because the fourth Jack on the board has made their pair of Jacks less valuable. The term “counterfeit” is used because the fourth Jack has made it more likely that another player has a pair of Jacks as well, effectively “counterfeiting” the value of the first player’s hand.

In poker, the term “cripple” is often used to describe a player who has lost a significant portion of their chips or stack, usually due to a big pot or several bad hands in a row. When a player is “crippled,” they typically have very few chips left and are at a severe disadvantage compared to other players at the table.

A crippled player may be forced to play very conservatively, only making the minimum bets and hoping to catch a lucky break, or they may choose to go all-in with what little they have left in an attempt to double up and stay in the game.

In poker, a “crying call” refers to a call made by a player on the river despite having a weak or marginal hand and a strong suspicion that their opponent has a better hand.

The player may make the call begrudgingly, as they feel like they are likely to lose the hand but feel compelled to make the call due to pot odds, previous action, or other factors. The term “crying” is used to suggest that the player is making the call with reluctance and may be emotional about the decision.

In poker, “Broadway” is a slang term used to refer to the highest straight possible on the board. It is also known as a “royal straight” or “ace-high straight,” and consists of the cards A-K-Q-J-10, all of the same suit. For example, if the board shows A-K-Q-J-9, any player holding a 10 in their hand would have a Broadway straight. The term “Broadway” comes from the famous street in New York City, which is often associated with glitz and glamour.
In poker, the cutoff is the position at the poker table immediately to the right of the dealer button. This position is considered to be a favorable one because the player sitting in the cutoff is one of the last to act in a betting round, which gives them an advantage in terms of information. The cutoff is also sometimes referred to as the “cutoff seat” or simply “the cutoff.”

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